#4 Living (while bleeding)

These notes on our fourth session are brought to us courtesy of one of the group, Diane Doran.

‘While Bleeding’ by Doireann Ní Ghriofa

The poem has many layers, hinting at: –
1. Social status (too expensive/vintage shop)
2. expectations on women to be/look a certain way (blusher on cheeks/lipstick on tissues)
3. Shame many women carry about what are normal is a normal bodily function
4. The poet uses red to sum up the female experience – red an emotionally intense colour.

After the poem we discussed how Viagra was once discovered to be effective or period pain however due to apparent side effects was shut down – It was agreed that we should look further into this – does it draw parallels between the papacy and the pill debate recently?

Conversations with Friends by Sally Rooney

Conversation with Friends brought up some discussion on: –

Silence in pain – why are women expected to put up with pain?

What is stopping women from asserting themselves and breaking out of the patriarchy?

We touched on the theme of rich v’s poor – wealthy people are more resourceful due to money and as such will always find a way to get ahead – an inequitable system is leading to an even bigger divide amongst people and this divide becomes more apparent when we consider different races & genders in society.

The importance of consent – twice the consent of the patient in the text wasn’t sought

We talked about the importance of considering the perspective of the patient – in the text she stated both she and the doctor hated each other – What are the elements that will potentially lead a person to feel this way about their caregivers, to have no trust established between them?

The doctor in the text seems oblivious to the patients pain – where do doctors need to draw the line with respect comforting patients

Discussed the importance of giving patients information about what it is that is happening to them.

Discussed the societal expectation to keep your emotions locked up until appropriate time – what is causing this disability when it comes to expressing ourselves? – leads to repressing our true history when in a hospital setting – again comes back to putting up with pain & silencing ourselves.

Some elements of shame expressed – unprotected sex/sex outside of marriage – the girl felt embarrassed to disclose the full details of her sexual experience to the doctor.

Talked about women’s paraphernalia for periods and how men need to be more open and receptive to what women’s body’s are capable of and not add to the shame by keeping it a secret.

‘Notes on Bleeding’ by Emilie Pine, from Notes to Self

Again the theme is around the shame of having a period – hiding it from others – the idea that it is dirty and somehow women/girls are somehow stained.
Focuses on the expectation of women to look & act a particular way (shave/apply foundation)

From my perspective – i found it ironic that we read a redacted text – why is it embarrassing for us to sit and read/listen to the full no holds barred text? – as medical professionals I feel the ability to not get embarrassed by the things we hear will be a very important skill.

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Best description of an anxiety attack

This description of an anxiety attack in Sally Rooney’s Normal People is particularly accurate for a specific sort of anxiety and, especially as it proceeds, becomes exceptionally detailed and therefore very helpful to anyone trying to understand what a sufferer of such an attack goes through.

His anxiety, which was previously chronic and low-level, serving as a kind of all-purpose inhibiting impulse, has become severe. His hands start tingling when he has to perform minor interactions like ordering coffee or answering a question in class. Once or twice he’s had major panic attacks: hyperventilation, chest pain, pins and needles all over his body. A feeling of dissociation from his senses, an inability to think straight or interpret what he sees and hears. Things begin to look and sound different, slower, artificial, unreal. The first time it happened he thought he was losing his mind, that the whole cognitive framework by which he made sense of the world had disintegrated for good, and everything from then on would just be undifferentiated sound and colour. Then within a couple of minutes it passed, and left him lying on his mattress coated in sweat.

Sally Rooney, Normal People (Faber & Faber, 2018), p. 206.