Photography


Yet despite the obvious layers of artifice, there is something insistent and revealing in these scenes [Corinne May Botz’s photographs of medical actors,the hired professionals who act out illnesses in order to train medical students in caring for patients]. In her 2014 essay “The Empathy Exams,” the writer Leslie Jamison explored her own experience working as a medical actor, and the complex negotiation and performance involved in expressing one’s own pain and in learning to respond to the pain of others.

Full article in the New Yorker >>>

From the Guardian >>

Beate Taube, 44, by Walter Schels

Beate Taube, 44, by Walter Schels

Horrifying though photographing the bodies was, more shocking still for Schels and Lakotta was the sense of loneliness and isolation they discovered in their subjects during the before-death shoots. “Of course we got to know these people because we visited them in the hospices and we talked about our project, and they talked to us about their lives and about how they felt about dying,” explains Lakotta. “And what we realised was how alone they almost always were. They had friends and relatives, but those friends and relatives were increasingly distant from them because they were refusing to engage with the reality of the situation. So they’d come in and visit, but they’d talk about how their loved one would soon be feeling better, or how they’d be home soon, or how they’d be back at work in no time. And the dying people were saying to us that this made them feel not only isolated, but also hurt. They felt they were unconnected to the people they most wanted to feel close to, because these people refused to acknowledge the fact that they were dying, and that the end was near.”

Some of the subjects, says Schels, were bitter about how lonely the business of dying had made them feel – for some, this was why they agreed to take part in the project. “Some of the dying said, ‘It’s so good you’re doing this – it’s really important to show what it’s like. No one else is listening to me, no one wants to hear or know what it’s really like.'”

General Practice highlights the vital role of GPs in contemporary Irish society, providing a glimpse into the usually private interactions between GP and patient. In colour and black-and-white photographs, the photographer Fionn McCann captures the trials, tribulations and sometimes humour of these encounters..

Through the sensitivity of McCann’s lens, the frontline work of GPs is revealed in all its diversity. In the consulting room or on home visits, the GP may be called upon to medicate, to perform procedures or simply to explain and reassure. Above all, the confessional quality of the patient-GP encounter, where listening to the patient’s concerns is of prime importance, is underlined.

This exhibition marks the closing event of the tercentenary celebrations of the Medical School of Trinity College Dublin. It is the inspiration of the Professor of General Practice, Tom O’Dowd who commissioned Fionn McCann as photographer. The images were made between 2008 and 2011, and document a series of patients’ visits to six General Practitioners throughout Ireland. The GPs and the featured patients gave permission to have McCann present during these normally private encounters and the project was ethically approved by the Irish College of General Practitioners.

My essay on the exhibition for the Irish Medical Times is here >>>

http://www.fionnmccann.com/

<p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/53148502″>St. Brigid’s</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/user14579081″>&Uacute;na Spain</a> on <a href=”http://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

http://www.unaspain.com/

http://www.eyeoftaggart.com/#a=0&at=0&mi=2&pt=1&pi=10000&s=5&p=3

Really looking forward to seeing this, not least cause it reminds me of the John Berger – Jean Mohr collaboration in A Fortunate Man:

General Practice is a forthcoming exhibition of photographs at the Gallery of Photography in Temple Bar, Dublin, which highlights the vital role of GPs in contemporary Irish society, providing a glimpse into the usually private interactions between GP and patient. In colour and black-and-white photographs, the photographer Fionn McCann captures the trials, tribulations and sometimes humour of these encounters.

From General Practice, copyright Fionn McCann

Through the sensitivity of McCann’s lens, the frontline work of GPs is revealed in all its diversity. In the consulting room or on home visits, the GP may be called upon to medicate, to perform procedures or simply to explain and reassure. Above all, the confessional quality of the patient-GP encounter, where listening to the patient’s concerns is of prime importance, is underlined.

This exhibition marks the closing event of the tercentenary celebrations of the Medical School of Trinity College Dublin. It is the inspiration of the Professor of General Practice, Tom O’Dowd who commissioned Fionn McCann as photographer. The images were made between 2008 and 2011, and document a series of patients’ visits to six General Practitioners throughout Ireland. The GPs and the featured patients gave permission to have McCann present during these normally private encounters and the project was ethically approved by the Irish College of General Practitioners.

The exhibition runs from 16 – 27 May 2012, admission free. There are 47 images in total and a video installation playing additional imagery. There is accompanying text for both the exhibition and the individual images. An introductory essay will be included in the accompanying catalogue.

http://www.galleryofphotography.ie/exhibitions/general_practice.html